COUGH

Coughing is the body’s way of removing foreign material or mucus from the lungs and upper airway passages or of reacting to an irritated airway. Coughs have distinctive traits you can learn to recognize. A cough is only a symptom, not a disease, and often the importance of your cough can be determined only when other symptoms are evaluated.

 

DRY OR CHESTY COUGH

A productive cough produces phlegm or mucus (sputum). The mucus may have drained down the back of the throat from the nose or sinuses or may have come up from the lungs. A productive cough generally should not be suppressed—it clears mucus from the lungs. There are many causes of a productive cough, such as:

  • Viral illnesses. It is normal to have a productive cough when you have a common cold. Coughing is often triggered by mucus that drains down the back of the throat.
  • Infections. An infection of the lungs or upper airway passages can cause a cough. A productive cough may be a symptom of pneumonia, bronchitis, sinusitis, or tuberculosis.
  • Nasal discharge (postnasal drip) draining down the back of the throat. This can cause a productive cough or the feeling that you constantly need to clear your throat.
  • Smoking or other tobacco use. A productive cough in a person who smokes or uses other forms of tobacco is often a sign of lung damage or irritation of the throat or oesophagus.

A non-productive cough is dry and does not produce sputum. A dry, hacking cough may develop toward the end of a cold or after exposure to an irritant, such as dust or smoke. There are many causes of a non-productive cough, such as:

  • Viral illnesses. After a common cold, a dry cough may last several weeks longer than other symptoms and often gets worse at night.
  • Bronchospasm. A non-productive cough, particularly at night, may mean spasms in the bronchial tubes (bronchospasm) caused by irritation.
  • Allergies. Frequent sneezing is also a common symptom of allergic rhinitis.
  • Exposure to dust, fumes, and chemicals in the work environment.
  • Asthma. A chronic dry cough may be a sign of mild asthma. Other symptoms may include wheezing, shortness of breath, or a feeling of tightness in the chest.
  • Blockage of the airway by an inhaled object, such as food or a pill.

 


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HOW SALT LIFE THERAPY CAN HELP

Salt Therapy can not only bring much-needed relief, but also prevent the frequent recurrence of your symptoms. Prescription drugs and inhalers may bring immediate relief, but used as a complementary treatment Salt Therapy has a lasting effect.

  • Salt kills bacteria
  • Salt Therapy widens the airways by reducing inflammation
  • Salt Therapy helps to shift retained mucus and therefore reduces the chance of infection

Salt Therapy is a clinically proven complementary natural, safe and beneficial method of treatment for every age group.

HOW MANY SESSIONS DO I NEED

  • 10-15 sessions are recommended for long term results.
  • The sessions should be frequent; about two or three a week is suggested.

Most clients do 1-2 Salt Therapy courses a year. In between they might come back for some top-up sessions. Why not contact Glanmire or Grange clinics to discuss any questions you may have.